The Growth of Cybercrime and Cybercrime Prevention in Virtual Worlds

Virtual worlds are no longer the backwater playgrounds of a few computer-adept programmers. They are multi-billion dollar worldwide industries spanning the fields of entertainment, communications, information technology, and increasingly law enforcement. In short, there's money to be made, and with an expansive, loosely-regulated product like virtual worlds comes the potential for cybercrime.

I wrote several months ago about how law enforcement agencies are increasingly turning to virtual world account information to provide breaks in real-world legal cases, but what about crimes committed entirely within a virtual sphere?

Several news outlets from around the world are increasingly looking at what is required to secure a profitable industry from brazen exploitation by scammers, money launderers, and cyberpirates. Regulators are calling for cybercrime task forces within physical police departments. The frontier of virtual worlds seems poised to get some new lawmen.

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As Virtual Worlds Grow in Commerical Importance, Do They Need a Police Force?

 Virtual worlds are changing how we do business, but they're not without pitfalls. As one Chinese government official found out, doing business in virtual worlds still involves a fair amount of risk.

The official is urging other law enforcement agencies to take virtual world offenses seriously. But why?

Pixels and Policy takes a look at why one of the world's most virtually-involved nations is awash in virtual criminal activity, and why police officers are struggling to adapt old law to virtual situations.

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